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of political party we want to be asked whether they want to become a party that david brooks, the conservative, described, a party that will not compromise the matter how sweet the deal for the site might be and how great consequences for our nation. >> hariri is talking about conservative "new york tes - -- have we read it is talking about conservative "new york times" columnist david brooks, wrote that the republican party is no longer a normal party. its members, he says, don't accept the logic of compromise. >> forgive me, i have to correct your copy again. he is a great calmness, but he's not conservative -- great columnist, but he's not conservative. he is moderate. >> modate conservative. >> no, he is moderate, open to all views. what you are saying, if you hear eric cantor john boehner, we are ready for tax reform, which was done in the mid-1980's. you cut out the loopholes and you use the money to cut rates. you get the fairness. rich don't have advantages by having the lobbyists create loopholes and exploit them. you stimulate economic growth because the loopholes and in and of thems
that it is an insult to the family that rebekah brooks, the editor of "news of the world" at the time, is still at her post in news international? >> i've made very clear she was rit to resign. th resnati should have beenccepted. there needs to be root and branch change at this entire organization. >> mr. speaker, i thank the prime minister for that answer and he's right to take the position that rebekah brook should go. and i hope you will come to the debate that ruperturdoch should drop his bid for b sky b, should rise the world has changed and should listen to this house of commons. >> i agree with what the right old gentleman has said and i think it's good that the house of commons is going to speak with one voice. >> this evidence cts sious doubt on mr. coleson's ashurntss that the phone hacking over which he resigned was an isolated example of illegal activities. the prime minister says the chief of staff is not passed on this very serious information. can he now tell us what information he proposes t take against the chief of staff? >> i have given, i think, the fullest possible answer i could
make of rebekah brooks on tuesday, this is a story which will run for months if not years with police investigations, judicial inquiries, lawsuits and any number of other threats still piling up against the mpany. but it's a significant day. >> the president's press conference, global implications for europe and th united states and the rupert--upert murdoch case. >>> funding for charlie rose was provided by the following: storyline. it's happening every day, all across america. every time a storefront opens. or the midnight oil is burned. or when someone chases a dream, not just a dollar. they are small business owners. so if you wanna root for a real hero, support small business. shop small. additional funding provided by these funders: and by bloomberg a provider of multimedia news and information services worldwide. from our studiosn new york city, this is charlie rose. >> psident obama had a press conferen earlier th morning following five days of closed door meetings with top congressional leaders. at the news conference his third in three weeks the president continued to press
be months before they know how much damage is actually been done. >> brown: and david brooks and ruth marcus analyze the week's news. >> lehrer: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> well, the best companies are driven by new ideas. >> our future depends on new ideas. we spend billions on advanced technologies. >> it's all about investing in the future. >> we can find new energy-- more cleaner, safer and smarter. >> collaborating with the best in the field. >> chevron works with the smartest people at leading universities and tech companies. >> and yet, it's really basic. >> it's paying off every day. the william and flora hewlett foundation, working to solve social and environmental problems at home and around the world. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: americans seeking work, and many hoping to hold on to their jobs, found little
monitoring. >> woodruff: mark shields and david brooks analyze the week's news. >> suarez: and hari sreenivasan previews the coming clash between the u.s. and japanese teams in the women's world cup final with christine brennan of "u.s.a. today" and abc. >> this is really a little bit about soccer and a lot about nationalism and about, whether it's tidally-winks or soccer, americans want to see americans win. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> well, the best companies are driven by new ideas. >> our history depends on new ideas. we spend billions on advanced technologies. >> it's all about investing in the future. >> we can find new energy-- more cleaner, safer and smarter. >> collaborating with the best in the field. >> chevron works with the smartest people at leading universities and tech companies. >> and yet, it's really basic. >> it's paying off everyday. and the william and flora hewlett foundation, working to solve social and environmental problems at home and around the world. and with the ongoi
"news of the road." the former editor, rebekah brooks, was answering questions after being arrested on allegations of hacking and bribing police while at the newspaper. british parliamentarians also grilled media mogul rupert murdoch and his son james pre- empt rupert murdoch apologized for the phone hacking, but he denied that he was ultimately responsible. he interrupted his son to say that the day was the most humble in his life. the proceedings took a dramatic turn when a protester hit rupert murdoch with a foam pie. >> there was a police escort for rupert murdoch as soon arrive for the parliamentary hearing. he and his son james appeared together. they faced tough questioning but were not r0quired to answer anything self incriminating. his son james was talking, and rupert interrupted. >> this is the most humble moment of my life. >> , murdoch said he had lost sight of "news of the world" and that he really did not know what was happening at the paper. the chief denied ultimate responsibility for the paper and blamed those he had trusted to run the paper. he also explained why
editor rebekah barooks. murdoch, his son james, and rebekah brooks are supposed to be talking before parliament. >> birgit? >> the former news of the world journalist had been hired by cameron as his press spokesman, and he had been hired even their david cameron was warned that he was actually involved in the phone hacking scandal, so it is his closeness to rupert murdoch and to some of these journalists that is being questioned at the moment by many people in the british public. >> speaking of rupert murdoch, he has blt up a very powerful media empire in the united states and britain and elsewhere. how badly has his empire been affected by this scandal? >> well, tuesday is going to be a really fascinating day. rupert murdoch and his son and a former editor, rebekah brooks, will be appearing before parliament and will be answering questions and why they have not acted on it. ed miliband, the leader of the labor party -- labour party, they will be arguing for his power to be curbs. there is a big discussion. in the u.s., and they are investigating. tomorrow and the next days and week
. >> brown: once the murdochs were done, another central figure in the scandal-- rebekah brooks-- appeared before the committee. she was editor of the now- defunct "ws of the world" during the phone hacking, and later became chief executive at the tabloid's british parent firm news international before resigning last week. brooks said she only recently learned that the phone of the young murder victim, milly dowler, had been targeted. >> it seems incredible that you, as the editor, were so unaware of such fundamental issues to do with this investigation. >> i just.. i think... in some ways, just the opposite-- i don't know anyone in their right mind who would authorize, know, sanction, approve of anyone listening to the voice mails of milly dowler in those circumstances. >> brown: brooks was arrested on sunday, and she repeatedly said today there were things she could not discuss due to the ongoing investigation. but she did say she has lasting regrets that everything did not come out long ago. >> of course, i have regrets. i mean, the idea that milly dowler's phone was accessed by someone
david brooks said, as you well know. "if the republican party were a normal party it would take advantage of this amazing moment. it is being offered trillions of dollars in spending cuts in exchange for a few hundred miion dollarofevenue increases. if the debt ceiling talks fail indendent vors will see that democrats were willing to compromise but republicans were not. if responsible republicans don't take control, independents will conclude the republican fanaticism caused this default. they will conclude that republicans are not fit to govern and they will be right." david brooks. >> i don't agree that at all. that discounts the notion that the vast majority of people in this country thinkovernment's way too big and if you lo at them... look at what the role of the government is, i think that's a great insiders's vw, i don't think the that represents the view point of people across this country at all. >> rose: okay, but i suspect if the president said to you or you today the president mr. president, do you think the government's too big? would say, yes, i do. >> i think he w
a government default. >> lehrer: mark shields and david brooks analyze the week's news. >> woodruff: and jeffrey brown gets a rare inside look at a syrian city where anti- government demonstrations have grown bigger and bolder from anthony shadid of "the new york times." >> reporter: hama is syria's fourth largest city. it's a significant place, and since last month when security forces withdrew, you've seen, i think, a notion of freedom emerge there. >> lehrer: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> well, the best companies are driven by new ideas. >> our future depends on new ideas. we spend billions on advanced technologies. >> it's all about investing in the future. >> we can find new energy-- more, cleaner, safer and smarter. >> collaborating with the best in the field. >> chevron works with the smartest people at leading universities and tech companies. >> and yet, it's really basic. >> it's paying off every day. the william and flora hewlett foundation, working to solve social and environmental problems at home and
a group of comments from the new york time from washington david brooks, with me here in new york, david leonhardt, roger cohen and tom friedman. they have all won too many awards to talk about. mi pleased to have all of em on this progr today to lk about america. what's the challenge for us? because wherever i go around the world the thing they say is tt we want america to take care of their business at home first, so that they can lead the world and pla an important part as the rest of the world changes. >> well, charlie, i think the world does understan that america provides a certain degree ofglobal governance and global goods, public goods that stabilize the world and fuel the global economy. i mean to me we are the tent pole that holds up the world. if we buckle your kids won't just grow up in a different america, they will grow up in a different world. and that i what i think what is playing out here is so important. i think our challengright now is to do four things at once. i think we have to stimulate the economy a little more because clearly we're rolling back, there are signs
in the united kingdom. and rebecca brook she's the chief executive over the news corporate newspapers here in the uk and she was editor and chief at the time of some of the most egregious alleged incident. >> do they have the power of a subpoena? >> there's some question about that. news international, the newspaper division has put out a statement saying that both mr. murdock, james murdock and ms. brooks will cooperate. but they didn't say necessarily that they'll testify so there's some question as to what form that cooperation will take. >> what does news international have to say about the latest allegations concerning former prime minister gordon brown? >> well he made these very anguished charges that news corp. had essentially targeted him, had sought to damage him. and interestingly, the allegations involved two newspapers that are not the tabloid news of the world but now we know it's been shuttered because of the role in the growing scandal. he says the times of london, reporters for the excuse me sunday times, had misrepresented themselves in order to obtain private and persona
taxes with 9.1% unemployment. >> woodruff: columnist david brooks in the "new york times" today criticized what i said was the anti-tax faction in the republican party and said it does not accept the logic of compromise. he said this is a movement with no sense of moral decency because it's prepared for the united states to ignore the debt limit. >> well, mr. brooks apparently is not listening to the people that i'm hearing from in my state and across the country. look, this deal is is not over yet. we still have some time. thankfully between now and august 2 to reach some sort of negotiated outcome. but what i think david brooks underestimates is what it's going to take to pass this. not only through the house but also through the senate. it's going to require 60 votes in the senate. so it will take more than the president having a press conference or having a meeting. we need to come up with a package that can actually pass both branches of the congress between now and august 2. and i just frankly don't think tax increases particularly during a weak economic recovery, are like
brooks who also had to give up her job at news corp and now is under her own suspicion? >> well, she was editor of news of the world which is the paper at the center of all this, as was andy coalson. and basically all of them have been saying they knew nothing about it. they would not have sanctioned it. and there's a great deal of skepticism. basically what'sappening isç everybody involved in this-- and this includes members of the media, politicians, members of parliament, the police-- are all trying to shift the blame on to someone else. indeed when sir paul and john yates resigned they got a parting shot at david cameron for hiring andy coalson. the same thing is happening with rebecca brooks. she's saying she's done nothing wrong. she's quite angry at having been arrested yesterday. and all this willçç gain in intensity at least for the next 48 hours until parliament goes into recess. >> ifill: prime minister cameron cut short his visit to africa and is coming back to prepare for tomorrow, this inquiry being conducted by parliament. what do we expect there? >> well, tomorr
? >> in the modern era, there isn't a lyndon johnson. the criticism of him, by david brooks most recently, is that he's too much like the senate majority leader. the president has a bully pulpit and he used it. the fact that republicans startete screaming bloody murde, indicate that they are worried about it. >> charles? >> the problem is this has the feel of a town with a leader who is not leading. he has not proposed a budget t on. the one he proposed was voted down by the senate 97-0, it was so preposterous. we have a president in full campaign mode was not proposing anything at a public -- who knows whether in private. there is no democratic proposal on the table for the budget. he is demagoguing against medicare and the ryan plan. he has decided, do that and that is how you get reelected. that is why the town is laundering. >> consistency has not been a problem with republicans. they endorsed the ryan plan, which does not provide for a balanced budget, and now they are pushing for a balanced budget. 103 house republicans have gone on record as saying they will not vote to rse t deb ceiling unles
. there is still pressure on senior figures atne international" including a former editor, or backup brooks. even though there is not this commercial closure, there is also a smart business decision by murdoch because the newspaper wasn't losing money. although he seems to be bowling to political pressure -- the newspaper was losing money, and although he seems to be bound to the political pressure, it makes financial sense. >>> parliamentary elections for next mon in syria acrdgo a newspaper which has close ties to the government. it said reforms on the media and political parties must be passed first. meanwhile, one of the centers of the uprising and the president, groups say that the police fired at the crowds demanding reforms wednesday. activists say at least 20 people died since forces moved in earlier this week. >>> the president of yemen has madeis first tevision appearance sie sufferi severe burns and an attack at the beginning of last month. he repeated his call for dialogue among yemen's rival political groups and gave no sign that he wasx prepared to step down, but he also did not say
british newspapers. murdoch and his son james will appear with rebecca brooks, the chief ceo of the british newspaper branch. she is also the former chief editor of "the news of the world," the tabloid which closed in the face of mounting evidence that it and other newspapers gained information by illegal means such as hacked voice mails and buying of policemen. the planned merger of the new york and frankfurt stock exchanges has passed another milestone. >> a large portion of shareholders approved the deal, which creates the world's biggest stock exchange. the approval was one of the last major obstacles to the merger plan. nyse/ueor -- nyse/euronext shareholders already gave the approval last week. authorits 1 5 biion euros in long-term bonds, but only high yields, reflecting concerns over rome's ability to stabilize finances. european shares lost ground for the fourth time in five sessions. the dax finished today lower. the same for the eurostoxx 50. the dow jones industrial also ended the session down by 0.4%. the euro is trading for $1.4149. russia is taking a step into
krugman and david brooks th columnists at the "new york times". this conversation took pla before the president's press conference and therefore was edited accordingly. >> whave no consensus in our political system. there is no center. we have no consensus about what all to be happening. so if you try to strike a lo-term deal you're basically stking a deal that nobody actually beeves and that isot going to be adhered to. i think we buy we buy se time. shouldn't be negotiating at all about the debt ceiling but we buy someime and give the voters another chance to weigh in. >> we really need to cut i think some of the rating agencies have said this, we need to cut $4 trillion to sort of stabilize debt levels and if we don't do that that's really bad news. and then the second thing i do think both parties may find it useful to have a framework. no, we're to the going to write a plan that is going to dictate the next ten years of politics but both parties may find it extremely useful to have a framework going forward and believe me none of these plans are very specific. there's a lot o
of the world" editor rebekah brooks remains unclear. for now, she remains c.e.o. of the paper's parent company in britain, news international. there may be implications for murdoch's proposed $12 billion takeover of the cable television network british sky broadcasting as well. his news corporation already owns three other newspapers in britain and, in this country, "the wall street journal", "fox news" and the "new york post" among others. this afternoon, reports surfaced that the company might replace the sunday "news of the world" with another murdoch publication. its sister paper "the sun" -- published weekly and saturday-- could add a sunday edition. for more on this story, we turn to ned temko, a writer for the "observer" newspaper in london. ned, welcome back, thanks for being with us. so what was the thinking behind this dramatic decision to shut down this very profitable newspaper? >> well, the best description i've heard this evening is that this is the first newspaper in history to die of shame. but that's not strictly true. it was a commercial decision. it was a huge exercise in da
gerson. david brooks is off tonight. a few moments ago, the house of representatives did, in fact, pass the boehner bill by a vote of 218 to 210. they needed 216 to pass. there were no democrats among those 218. michael, what words would you use to describe, as a result of that vote a few moments ago, where we are now? >> well, i think it would be fascinating if it weren't so frightening. we have a situation where about 10% of the republican caucus in the house wanted to humiliate their own speaker in order to get a vote on a balanced budget amendment that is symbolic and completely irrelevant to the process. i think that's a sign of weakness on the republican part. it undermined their negotiating status in the senate. i think harry reid now has a lot of cards. i think he's gone to mitch mcconnell and said, what, do your people need to support my approach, the reid approach?" and that's what i believe to be the main approach that's taken and the housing will have to look at it again and they have to pass it with democratic support. >> lehrer: mark, what's happened? >> the irony, jim, on
, "washington post" columnist michael gerson. david brooks is away tonight. mark what do you make of that fannie mae story? >> well, the -- for home ownership is something i can recall president clinton speaking about it, president bush speaking about it, how important it was, a measure of achievement in the country. but as you go to the story of fannie mae, what it comes down to is they privatized profit. in other words, whether it's the investor. but they socialize losses. in other words, everybody else in the country picks up the tab when it doesn't, when it goes under. that is really --. >> lehrer: while you're making money yourself. >> you're making money, it's mine. >> lehrer: but if i lose t it's yours, government. >> it's yours, taxpayers. and i think that's a really bad public policy. >> lehrer: michael? >> well, it's still also the political context in which everyone's operating right now. as far as i know the president didn't have anything to do with this. but the bursting bubble of the housing market has really undermined coidence in the whole economy. we've had a larger percentage f
. darrell west heads the brookings institution's centers for governance studies and tech innovation. and cecilia kang is technology reporter for the 'washington post." she was at the white house for today's event. cecilia, i'll start with you because you were there. one clarification. the questions that were coming in, how were they picked and how much do we know about whether they were filtered for content or diversity of topic, et cetera? >> well, twitter did have the last say on what questions would be served up and asked to the president. but what they did is took pains to explain they had a search algorithm as well that searched for the most common and popular subjects and questions and they did that by searching what kinds of questions like john boehner's house representative john boehner's question, was retweeted and repeat sod many times, there's such a fertile discussion around his question. that made his question pop to the top of the list. so that's how they actually chose the questions. but ultimately twitter had the last say on what questions would ultimately be served
online and again here tomorrow evening with mark shields and david brooks, among others. thank you and good night. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. captioning sponsored by macneil/lehrer productions captioned by media access group at wgbh access.wgbh.org which foot was it? best make that "best wishes." we don't want them getng their hopes up, do we? no, i suppose not. have always done it. why should she watch the flowers? nobody really remembers,
rebekah brooks, who edited the "news of the world" at the time, to resign. >> sreenivasan: in another development, scotland yard released a statement accusing unnamed individuals of trying to sabotage its investigation. part of that probe involves allegations that murdoch journalists paid bribes to police for information. rescuers in russia searched a huge reservoir on the volga river today, after a cruise boat sank on sunday. at least 55 people were killed, with 79 rescued and dozens more missing. it happened about 450 miles east of moscow, in windy, rainy conditions. the boat sank in just eight minutes. today, debris was visible in the water as search boats looked for victims and survivors. families stood by, hoping for news. those are some of the day's major stories. now, back to judy. >> woodruff: and we turn to africa where a nation is born, but with many troubles. at midnight friday in juba, the capital of the new south sudan, this sign said it all: "free at last". the turning of the clock to july 9, saturday, meant independence, and the creation of the world's newest nation. >>
Search Results 0 to 32 of about 33 (some duplicates have been removed)